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Farting On A Date

READING OUT LOUD IN AN INSIDE VOICE - What motivates US?

I don't have an iPad, Kindle or Nook:  BUT I NOW HAVE ACCESS TO A LIBRARY.  Old school, I am.  (I was also very late in getting a mobile phone and the internet -- you wouldn't expect that from a blogger but it's the truth.)

I took the little ones to the public library last week.  I quickly realized it was difficult to keep a certain small person from READING OUT LOUD IN AN INSIDE VOICE because she didn't really know about libraries and being quiet in them.  I haven't been inside a library -- since -- moving to this town.  Before that, we could walk to the library in our previous town, but I didn't do it often with babies to you know, get MYSELF a book to read.  She will learn, since her big sister was all in her face,

"You do KNOW this is a place where you HAVE TO be quiet?"  

The girls got signed up for library cards -- and picked out books -- each checked out two.  While my four year old was not really interested in a book, since was more interested in the toys.  

"Why do they have toys here?  I thought we were 'posed to be quiet?"  

My soon to be fourth-grader just was thrilled to find a tasseled book-mark.  

It's the little things that motivate us:  like the walk to the library for the promise of a new book, or is it?  After convincing the lady at the check out desk that I Really Did Live In Town, I checked out this book:

 

Book Description -


"Most people believe that the best way to motivate is with rewards like money--the carrot-and-stick approach. That's a mistake, says Daniel H. Pink in Drive. In this provocative and persuasive new book, he asserts that the secret to high performance and satisfaction--at work, at school, and at home--is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world. 

Drawing on four decades of scientific research on human motivation, Pink exposes the mismatch between what science knows and what business does-and how that affects every aspect of life. He examines the three elements of true motivation--autonomy, mastery, and purpose--and offers smart and surprising techniques for putting these into action in a unique book that will change how we think and transform how we live."

I'm just into the first chapter -- and it makes a lot of sense to me.    

The higher the reward, the lower the performance.   People need to be DRIVEN to TRY.  

There needs to be an internal motivation to try -- for various things -- but especially jobs -- beyond income.  

Screen shot 2011-08-28 at 10.18.21 AM The best use of money as a money as a motivator is to MAKE people not WORRY ABOUT MONEY. If you people enough that they aren't concerned about their basic needs, you take the issue off the table.  They no longer have that worry, fear and anxiety constantly stalking them.  (Although, I wonder how much of THAT motivates any number of us.  Mama's gotta pay the electric bill, you know -- you do what you have to.)

According to Pink, paying someone over and beyond their needs does not increase performance for tasks!  Being overpaid doesn't make a person ANY BETTER at their job, or motivated to DO any better.

But, does being underpaid (waves to half of the country...) create a situation where you are constantly stressed PERSONALLY about your situation and does effect your performance AND potentially effect your income?  I think so.

Does this make sense to you?   *goes to read more...*

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