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January 2013 posts

UK Lays out KICK ASS Advertising Codes for Weight + Diet Products

The UK just laid out some super-tough advertising guidelines for products and services aimed at the weight loss community - 

"This section applies to marketing communications for weight control and slimming foodstuffs, aids (including exercise products that make weight-loss or slimming claims), clinics and other establishments, diets, medicines, treatments and the like. If applicable, they must comply with Section 12: Medicines, Medical Devices, Health-related Products and Beauty Products and Section 15: Food, Food Supplements and Associated Health or Nutrition Claims)."

Check it out, it's a MOUTHFUL -  many most all we are unlikely to see in the US for years and years and years.  Some of the suggestions are amazing:   "Marketing communications for any weight-reduction regime or establishment must neither be directed at nor contain anything that is likely to appeal particularly to people who are under 18 or those for whom weight reduction would produce a potentially harmful body weight (BMI of less than 18.5 kg/m2). Those marketing communications must not suggest that being underweight is desirable or acceptable."

I love you, UK.  

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Via Cap.uk -

  1. 13.1  A weight-reduction regime in which the intake of energy is lower than its output is the most common self-treatment for achieving weight reduction. Any claim made for the effectiveness or action of a weight-reduction method or product must be backed, if applicable, by rigorous trials on people; testimonials that are not supported by trials do not constitute substantiation.

  2. 13.2  Obesity in adults is defined by a Body Mass Index (BMI) of more than 30 kg/m2. Obesity is frequently associated with a medical condition and a treatment for it must not be advertised to the public unless it is to be used under suitably qualified supervision. Marketing communications for non-prescription medicines that are indicated for the treatment of obesity and that require the involvement of a pharmacist in the sale or supply of the medicine may nevertheless be advertised to the public.

  3. 13.3  Marketing communications for any weight-reduction regime or establishment must neither be directed at nor contain anything that is likely to appeal particularly to people who are under 18 or those for whom weight reduction would produce a potentially harmful body weight (BMI of less than 18.5 kg/m2). Those marketing communications must not suggest that being underweight is desirable or acceptable.

  4. 13.4  Before they make claims for a weight-reduction aid or regimen, marketers must show that weight-reduction is achieved by loss of body fat. Combining a diet with an unproven weight-reduction method does not justify making weight-reduction claims for that method.

  5. 13.5  Marketers must be able to show that their diet plans are nutritionally well-balanced (except for producing a deficit of energy) and that must be assessed in relation to the category of person who would use them.

  6. 13.6  Vitamins and minerals do not contribute to weight reduction but may be offered to slimmers as a safeguard against any shortfall in recommended intake when dieting. 

  1. 13.7  Marketers promoting Very Low Calorie Diets or other diets that fall below 800 kilo-calories a day must do so only for short-term use and must encourage users to take medical advice before embarking on them. Marketers should have regard to the guidance on “Obesity: the prevention, identification, assessment and management of overweight and obesity in adults and children” (2006) published by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

  2. 13.8  Marketing communications for diet aids must make clear how they work. Prominence must be given to the role of the diet and marketing communications must not give the impression that dieters cannot fail or can eat as much as they like and still lose weight.

  3. 13.9  Marketing communications must not contain claims that people can lose precise amounts of weight within a stated period or, except for marketing communications for surgical clinics, establishments and the like that comply with rule 12.3, that weight or fat can be lost from specific parts of the body.

13.9.1 Marketing communications for surgical clinics, establishments and the like that comply with rule 12.3 must not refer to the amount of weight that can be lost.

13.10 Claims that an individual has lost an exact amount of weight must be compatible with good medical and nutritional practice. Those claims must state the period involved and must not be based on unrepresentative experiences. For those who are normally overweight, a rate of weight loss greater than 2 lbs (just under 1 kg) a week is unlikely to be compatible with good medical and nutritional practice. For those who are obese, a rate of weight loss greater than 2 lbs a week in the early stages of dieting could be compatible with good medical and nutritional practice.

13.10.1 Health claims in marketing communications for food products that refer to a rate or amount of weight loss are not permitted.

  1. 13.11  Resistance and aerobic exercise can improve muscular condition and tone and that can improve body shape and posture. Marketers must be able to substantiate any claim that such methods used alone or in conjunction with a diet plan can lead to weight or inch reduction. Marketing communications for intensive exercise programmes should encourage users to check with a doctor before starting.

  2. 13.12  Short-term loss of girth may be achieved by wearing a tight-fitting garment. That loss must not be portrayed as permanent or confused with weight or fat reduction. 

We'll never see this in the US.  People are too in love with fake.


BBGC Meets Al Roker and Forces Him To Sign A Book. <3

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(This would have been a super time to try out my brand-new Nikon, so as not to take a iPad shot of a mobile phone photo?)

My good friend Wendy heard that Al Roker had a live book signing near her hometown last night, so like a good Bariatric Bad Girl, she went!  

I didn't see her Facebook message to ME until the moment she was Sitting In the Bookstore With My Name On A Sticky-Note For Mr. Roker To Sign when I realized what was going on.  (This is partly because I am without cell-plan, and only see messages when I am near the computer now.  So, sorry?!)  When I saw this I was like like, "Why is Wendy at a party with resin lawn chairs in January -- with a book -- wai -- wha??"

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And then I remembered the proximity of her stalkery locale to New York City (no comment from the peanut gallery) and this happened.

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Wendy had a brief opportunity to talk to chat with Mr. Roker about the BBGC Bariatric Bad Girls Club and discussed fundraising we've done with the Obesity Action Coalition.  Thank you, Wendy -- and thank you Al!


Trigger warning - Aspire Assist Aspiration Therapy - Sucking vomit out of a tube for weight loss.

"Losing weight shouldn’t take the fun out of life – dinners out with friends, a glass of wine with dinner, or a home-cooked meal with your family. With the AspireAssist, there are no burdensome restrictions on what and when you can eat and drink. Continue to eat the foods you love – and as you start to lose weight, gradually learn how to make healthy choices to match your leaner, healthier body!"

With the Aspire Assist Aspiration Therapy System, you can STILL EAT the foods you crave!  Want that half-gallon of ice cream?  Feel free to dig in!

Nom those noms!

Just twenty minutes after your meal -- you can discreetly withdraw a portion (OF VOMIT) of your partially digested meal THROUGH YOUR ABDOMEN and dispose of it without the hassle of you know:  lower digestion,  fecal production and weight gain!

Digestive_enzymes

I thought this was an article from The Onion.

It's not.  It's for real.

Jezebel -

Dean Kamen, the inventor of the Segway, a machine that exists to stop people from walking, has teamed up with Aspire Bariatrics (that name — shudder) to apply for a patent on a pump that will suck food and beverage straight out of your stomach and rids it from your intestines/life.

Please hold me again.  I'm a Bariatric Patient that is FUCKING TERRIFIED by the thought of giving people the opportunity for controlled bulimia.  I am still wary that this can't be for real -

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The Aspire Assist Aspiration Therapy System works by reducing the calories absorbed by the body. After eating, food travels to the stomach immediately, where it is temporarily stored and the digestion process begins. Over the first hour after a meal, the stomach begins breaking down the food, and then passes the food on to the intestines, where calories are absorbed. The AspireAssist allows patients to remove about 30% of the food from the stomach before the calories are absorbed into the body, causing weight loss.
To begin Aspiration Therapy, a specially designed tube, known as the A-Tube™, is placed in the stomach. The A-Tube is a thin silicone rubber tube that connects the inside of the stomach directly to a discreet, poker-chip sized Skin-Port on the outside of the abdomen. The Skin-Port has a valve that can be opened or closed to control the flow of stomach contents. The patient empties a portion of stomach contents after each meal through this tube by connecting a small, handheld device to the Skin-Port. The emptying process is called “aspiration”.
The aspiration process is performed about 20 minutes after the entire meal is consumed and takes 5 to 10 minutes to complete. Because aspiration only removes a third of the food, the body still receives the calories it needs to function. For optimal weight loss, patients should aspirate after each major meal (about 3 times per day)  GAHHHH!!!!!!!!!!! initially. Over time, as patients learn to eat more healthfully, they can reduce the frequency of aspirations.

People Magazine - Half Their Size - No Surgery! No Gimmicks - A Rant from a Bariatric Patient.

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I watched ABC's 20/20 on Friday night as I typically do, and I was half-inspired, refreshed to push forward in my own journey as I continue to press on nearing nine years post gastric bypass surgery and ever so slightly PISSED OFF.  Why?  Read that cover again.  "No SURGERY - No GIMMICKS!"

People Magazine does this every year, much to the chagrin to every surgically altered bariatric patient in the blog-o-sphere.  ABC.  People Magazine.  The show and the magazine, both -- FULL OF GIMMICKS, and quite possibly more than one surgery.  "No SURGERY - No GIMMICKS!"

 Except when they're touting Beachbody, "lost the weight Atkins" AND a gastric bypass?    
Why is it celebrated to Lose Weight With Diet Plans like "Beachbody, Visalus and Atkins"   (All three were referred to in the program to at one point in the program ... were they sponsors?  Hello, RUBY GETTINGER IS HAWKING the 90-DAY VISALUS CHALLENGE?!?!) but life-saving bariatric
surgery or weight loss surgery --- is shunned in the same category?  Diets fail.  That's why they are so lucrative!  You go ON a diet so that you can fail a diet so that you can get on a diet so that you can fail a diet so you can go on a diet.  This is how people become morbidly obese and meet bariatric surgeons.
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(Image from Roni's Weigh)

I get it.  Diet companies pay to be on the show and in the magazine.
 
However, those living with morbid obesity also need to see the opportunity for success, and showing them the success of those who have succeeded with bariatric surgery is not something to be ashamed of.  Clearly SHAME made the woman in the article hide.

It's time to stop calling weight loss surgery a quick-fix, a gimmick or a cheat and give it the respect and attention it deserves.  The individuals who most benefit from having a bariatric procedure can be exposed to it's benefits instead of a constant barrage of useless diet advertisements.
WLS is the ONLY "diet" that has allowed myself, my husband, my mother in law and my sister in law  to live within normal weight ranges for the last 7-9 years.  What say you about your diet?

Should A Christian Have Weight Loss Surgery?

This question just popped up in my Google Alerts and brought me to a health and weight loss site faith-based called "Take Back Your Temple," 
"Hello…I was wondering if I could have your opinion. Do you think surgery as a weight loss option is “against God”? I have struggled a long time…and am beginning to consider this option. Can it not be a blessing from God, having this technology and knowledge to even be able to have this done? I know God can move mountains…including my weight. Does my interest in this mean a lack of faith? I know it is a gray area since the Bible doesn’t specifically discuss this topic…but I’d love to hear feedback from another Christian woman about this. I appreciate your wisdom, and please pray for me that I feel God’s guidance. Also please pray for Him to free me from my obesity, and to know His will. "

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The blogger replies:

Continue reading "Should A Christian Have Weight Loss Surgery?" »


Dieting can lead to food withdrawal and depression

I hate it when people abuse poor, poor mice.

Fat mouse
Dieting can lead to food withdrawal and depression

Over a six-week period, the team of experts fed one group of mice a low-fat diet, while feeding a second group of mice a high-fat diet, so that they could analyze how the different foods impacted the behavior of the animals.

Eleven percent of the calories in the low-fat diet consisted of fat, and 58% in the high-fat diet. This caused the high-fat group an 11% increase in their waist size, but they were not yet considered obese.

Fulton and her team then examined the association between rewarding mice with food and their behavioral and emotional outcomes by using a variety of methods that have been scientifically proven. The brains of the animals were also analyzed so that the experts could observe any changes that had occurred.

The researchers found that the high-fat group showed signs of anxiety, for example, they tried to avoid areas that were open. According to the authors, the animals' experiences physically changed their brains

Dopamine was one of the molecules in the brain that was observed. It allows the brain to reward people with good feelings, which in turn, motivates individuals to acquire particular behaviors.

Dopamine is a chemical which works the same in humans as it does in mice and other animals. CREB is a molecule which regulates the activation of genes that play a part in the functioning of human brains, including the ones that cause dopamine to be produced. It also contributes to the forming of memories.

Study -  Adaptations in brain reward circuitry underlie palatable food cravings and anxiety induced by high-fat diet withdrawal


Benefit of bariatric surgery may be temporary

This is not new news - however it just hit my Google alerts from my local news -
A major benefit of bariatric surgery, a cure for diabetes, may only be temporary.

How much water should I drink? #adultdiapersarehawt

How much water should I drink?  

Aren't we all supposed to have eight glasses of water a day?  

Or is it one ounce per pound of body weight?  HELP!  

I see water challenges on social media sites constantly -- I never know what their purpose was for -- considering they look a lot like this:  "EVERYONE STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND TAKE A DRINK OF WATER ---------- GOOD --------- NOW PEE!"  

I never caught on.  

Stupidwater

Huffington Post -

How much water am I meant to drink? Is it really eight cups a day?

The notion that we must all drink eight cups of water per day to improve our health is an old one, but it isn't exactly accurate. Although the suggestion dates back to at least the 1940s, the latest to carry the mantel are, unsurprisingly, bottled water companies.

Writing in the medical journal BMJ, Glasgow doctor Margaret McCartney pointed out that much of the current recommendations come from events sponsored by Danonewhich owns bottled water lines Evian, Volvic and Badoit.

The "8x8 advice" may also endure because, cost aside, it's harmless. And being over-hydrated sure beats dehydration, which can cause headaches, light-headedness, fatigue and other, more serious complaints. Water is essential for proper digestion, kidney function and brain function and is required by every cell of the body. But that doesn't mean we need to sip on it all day.

There may be another reason we've stuck with an inaccurate eight cups -- and that answer isn't nearly so straight forward: the right amount of water to drink is the amount that quenches your thirst.

"When you think about the way that the body handles water, you pee it out. The body regulates water very carefully and doesn't allow it to accumulate. Extra water is immediately excreted," says Dr. Stanley Goldfarb, a professor of medicine at University of Pennsylvania and an expert on fluid management.

What's more, our bodies tell us when we require water -- that's what the thirst mechanism does. Thirst doesn't mean you've reached a dire level of dehydration either. Explains Goldfarb: "When you get thirsty, the deficit of water in your body is trivial -- it's a very sensitive gauge. It might be only a one percent reduction in your overall water. And it just requires drinking some fluid."

Or food: about 20 percent of the fluid we receive each day comes from water-heavy foods like fruits and vegetables.

There is, however, one exception: for those who suffer from kidney stones -- masses of crystals that form in the urine and pass painfully through the urethra -- staying overly hydrated is very beneficial, as it dilutes the concentration of material that forms into the clumps.

The typical U.S. adult downs about four cups a day, which is shy of the Institute of Medicine's recommendation to drink about three liters of fluid for men and 2.2 liters for women. But others disagree with this assessment -- if that's the amount of water a person naturally drinks in response to thirst, that's fine. But there is no benefit to forcing extra water.

Just to reiterate, we're talking exclusively about over-hydration. Beware dehydrating factors like exercise, salty foods and hot weather, and be sure to replace the fluid you've lost. A surefire way to tell if you've replaced your water sufficiently? It's all in your urine. If you're producing pale yellow pee, you've reached a hydrated status.

You can keep drinking, but why?

 


Top 50 Emotional Eating Blogs - cue thud and human puddling.

I found this list  of the "Top 50 Emotional Eating Blogs 2012" through a blog I found via fitbloggin' this year.  This. list. is. amazing.  I'll share half - you can visit the link for the rest

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1. Life with Cake â€“ Greta Gleissner is a psychotherapist specializing in the treatment of eating disorders. Life with Cake is a personal blog about her recovery from an eating disorder and includes advice about addressing urges to eat emotionally.

2.  Karen C.L. Anderson â€“ Karen C.L. Anderson writes about what happens after achieving “weight-loss success”. She talks about self-acceptance, how to truly feel your feelings, and eating mindfully.

3. The Begin Within Blog â€“ The Begin Within Blog is a blog for individuals recovering from eating disorders. The blog covers a wide range of topics from binge eating to intuitive eating to kindness and compassion.

4. Savor the Blog â€“ Savor the Blog expands on the themes found in Savor, the popular book by Thich Nhat Hanh and Dr. Lilian Cheung. Many of the posts are about mindful eating, while others address the emotional reasons we make our food choices.

5. A Weigh Out â€“ A Weigh Out is a blog written by a number of contributors — all of them professionals in the field of nutrition, emotional eating, and eating disorder therapy. While some of the posts are personal reflections by the coaches and therapists, a number of the posts include advice about addressing emotions in our lives that can affect health — and diet.

Continue reading "Top 50 Emotional Eating Blogs - cue thud and human puddling." »


Being slightly overweight may actually help you live longer.

My people will live forever.   -MM

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A new study says being slightly overweight may actually help you live longer.  Researchers looked at data on nearly three million adults around the world.  They compared the body mass index, a measurement of weight in relation to height, to the risk of death.  The study found people with a little extra weight had a six percent lower risk of dying compared to people considered "normal" weight.  However, it's not an excuse to pack on the pounds.

Obese people had more than triple the risk of dying, according to the study.

The research looked at only death, not chronic medical conditions.

The study is published in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association

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