Posts categorized "Blogging" Feed

30 Days

meltingmama has logged in for 30 days in a row!

That's a miracle.

I never follow through with a food journal  (we know this through past history) thirty days is a big freaking deal.

As much as I bitch, moan and complain about it, food journaling works.  

Journaling shows me immediately where the concern areas are -- and Where I Am Screwing Up.  It's glaringly, painfully obvious what needs to change and why I don't lose weight when I think I should.  Because I am Too Busy Grazing Bites Of Crackers - Cheese - Cheese - and How About That Cheese?  As soon as I make myself accountable to writing it down, at least 75-95% of the time - I do it so much better.  

I screw up constantly. 

I break rules.

I am a huge mess.

But. 

I can do this.

I can do it
I have gone from 182 lbs to 165 lbs since my last OMGFREAKOUT weigh in.  It can work.  I'm not dieting.  I'm not really trying.  I am just checking in everyday and writing down my intake.

Join me if you want?


Things Girls Lie About

"No, right?"*stomps off*

"You'd NEVER."

"Like, EVER.

 


Thank you!

Beth and I OAC Awards

Michelle Vicari and I were honored to receive awards at the Obesity Action Coalition's Inaugural Event last weekend.

I received the OAC's Award for Advocate of the Year -- and Michelle for Membership Recruitment.

Thank you OAC, and thanks to those who nominated us!

 


Getting on the big train to fitbloggin' 2012!

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...and I cannot wait to go.    I went to fitbloggin' in 2010 for it's first year, missed last year ...

And, thanks to Big Train, I'm able to get there this year!  Woot!  

Continue reading "Getting on the big train to fitbloggin' 2012!" »


Oh. Yes. She. Did.

Hold the Press Releases, Suz!  

How do you go from not paying your taxes, failure to ship orders since 2011, closing your store, foreclosure, shutting down all communication to... THIS?

Continue reading "Oh. Yes. She. Did." »


The importance of belonging - THIS is why I do what I do.

I read a blog post yesterday regarding storytelling as a means of keeping a person "sick," stuck in the past, or marinating in their overall... bad place.  The blogger went so far as to suggest that the telling and retelling of ones stories might be an addiction.  *gets the crack pipe ready to share a story*

Bariatric After Life -

"I think we do it because it feeds a need for validation and justification (or even vindication) really. We need people to tell us we look good. We need people to tell us we “didn’t cheat” with surgery. We need people to tell us we are successful. We need people to forgive us (?!) for regaining 4.7 pounds. Mostly…we need to believe these things about ourselves, but since we don’t believe it ourselves, we seek the approval and agreement of others.

Here’s my next theory: I think this behavior is an addiction. I say this because I am an addict, and I know how easy it is to become addicted to the feeling you get when people praise you, or when people condemn others who dare to disagree with you. I believe it’s an addiction because, I am never content to stop telling the story to just ONE PERSON. Oh, sure…I might start with my best friend, but once I curry her agreement (and know she’s on my team, of course), I have to go collect OTHERS, or I might stop believing my story. Of course, I’ll have to embellish my story a little to get others to agree with me. I might have to make it sound more dire, or harrowing, or riveting. And, with each telling, the story will become more powerful, more believable, and more tellable.

Given that, how can I NOT share a riveting, powerful, extraordinary, unbelievable story with EVERYBODY. EVERYWHERE???

It’s a regular feeling-feeding frenzy. And it sounds like Addiction to me."

As I get the visual of myself lowering a chum bucket (blog post) into the sharky waters (The Interwebz) Yeah.  Because I'm trolling to Find Others to Agree With Everything I Say, right?  I ... guess?

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Am I feeding you with my stories?  Am I feeding myself?

I apologize?  *takes a hit*

What is addiction?

The seven criteria for substance dependence are:

(1)  Tolerance is defined by either of the following:

(a) A need for markedly increased amounts of the substance to achieve intoxication or desired effect.

(b) Markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same amount of the substance.

(2) Withdrawal, as manifested by either of the following: (a) The characteristic withdrawal syndrome for the substance (refer to Criteria A or B of the criteria sets for Withdrawal from specific substances). (b) The same (or a closely related) substance is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.

(3) The substance is often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than was intended.

(4) There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control substance use.

(5) A great deal of time is spent in activities necessary to obtain the substance (such as visiting multiple doctors or driving long distances), use the substance (such as chain smoking) or recover from its effects.

(6) Important social, occupational, or recreational activities are given up or reduced because of substance use.

(7) The substance use is continued despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problem that is likely to have been caused or exacerbated by the substance.

-Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Text Revision, Fourth Edition, (Copyright 2000). American Psychiatric Association.

Or behavioral addiction -

The term addiction is also sometimes applied to compulsions that are not substance-related, such as compulsive shopping, sex addiction/compulsive sex, overeating, problem gambling, exercise/sport and computer addiction. In these kinds of common usages, the term addiction is used to describe a recurring compulsion by an individual to engage in some specific activity, despite harmful consequences, as deemed by the user themselves to their individual health, mental state, or social life. There may be biological and psychological factors contributing to these addictions.

The blog post struck a nerve with me.  And here I am, indulging my "addiction" with likely 2000 words in response.  *twitch* 

I am a storyteller.  I may not be much good at it, because I lack attention to detail (sometimes I have the opposite -- complete detail with photographic memory) I have poor short term recall, and I lose parts of my stories.  Or not, but mostly I suck at storytelling.  

That blog post just told me not to Say Things Like That, like "I suck at storytelling," because then I will marinate in that Feeling, and then You Will Feel Compelled To Give Me Sympathy Or Give Me Compliments.

Uh, please don't.  #1 - I can read through bullshit.  #2 - I don't need sympathy over writing crappy blog posts.  If you did not want to read this, you'd just click away, right?

Thing is:  I can't tell if I Suck.  I might just be in the moment -- and writing out my feelings -- or sharing an experience because it's fresh on my mind.  When I bring up past issues, I try to share them with as much detail as I can recall, but that's where I fail.  (Don't Say That You Fail, Beth!)  

I just come to the computer and type, as I am doing right now.  I never plan to tell a story, whatever I share is whatever comes out of my fingers.  Because, uh, my fingers are magic.  I Am The Best Blogger Ever, And Everything I Type Is Pure Gold I Win At Blogging And Storytelling. 

Comic
But mostly not.  I know I suck.  I blog because I can, not because I'm any good at it.  And most of you quit reading about 200 words ago anyway.

I would suggest that most individuals who find cause to make blog entries (for example) are, indeed, storytellers.  I agree with the original blogger's suggestion that some people do rehash bad things from their past in order to garner more sympathy, attention or otherwise, but only sometimes.  Some people tell stories to garner lots of things, attention might be the least of things they want.  Ever heard of someone faking a debilitating disease for money?  It happens.  People do bad things sometimes.

However.

There are thousands of situations that people Do Not Share On Purpose because they might rather have No Attention.  And in our weight loss surgery community - in particular, People Do Not Share Lots Of Things Because -

They do not want to expose personal history, it HURTS.  

They don't want to appear less than ... anyone else.  

They may find that it's better to hide lots of things about themselves because they feel judged.  

Here is a comment from someone else in the community, who has dealt with some serious shit, in regards to this topic -

"Revisiting the past is a necessary evil for many of us that need to deal with the original reason of why they became obese in the first place. People need to tell their story to help them heal in order to get to that next step of recovery and happiness.  The events that happen in a person’s life that causes them to become obese are countless… some are abused, molested, lose a role model, bullied, eating disorders, and alcoholism… and on and on we can go.  These are real issues and HAVE to be spoken about. 

Once a person loses the weight their life will NEVER immediately be a flip of a coin and have a “HALLELUJAH I AM HEALED” scenario, the truth of the matter is the internal, physiological and mental causes and issue will take years of talking, therapy and talking, and more therapy to be resolved or repressed to a manageable level.  So, to answer the questions below:

 What would happen if you stopped telling your story?  If people stop telling their story they could regress, gain weight, have a transfer of addictions, or simply become depressed and have a feeling of being unwanted. People have to tell their story, because for most that is the ONLY therapy they can get / afford.  Lets face it when we lose all the weight we become a “different” person.

  • What would happen if you stopped saying where you’ve been and focused on where you ARE? Again refer to the above. Simply put, where you have been (the past) is what got you to where you are today (it is a part of you).  You CAN NOT forget about the past, because for most of us, the past is who and what you are it is where you spent most of your life.  The new you is honestly a small fraction of who you are and learning the new you will take years. 
  • What would happen if you lived in the now, rather than in the past? Living in the now and not in the past has to be a balance.  You have to talk about the past in order to make the now a better place.  You have to talk about the past in order to improve quality life for the now.  You have to talk about the past to deal with the emotional issues that all of us have to make today better.

 THE BARIATRIC AFTER LIFE (TM) IS NOT ALL ROSES AND BUTTERFLIES LIKE SOME IN THE COMMUNITY MAKE IT OUT TO BE.  You can’t shy away from the bad, or it will never go away."

I agree, to much of that.

In order to heal remember you have to tell your story, seek professional help, join a support group that is right for you and if you fall down or regress, remember you are not alone, and continue to fight and tell that story. 

The blogger says -

Each time you speak the negative — each time you retell your story — you give it renewed energy. Each time you replay that tape about how disappointed you are in this or that (person, behavior, event), you give it new life, new purpose, new meaning. But, you know what? If you just leave it unsaid and move forward, the story fades away in significance, power and meaning. Amazing.

And MM says -- Then You Find Yourself In Therapy at Age 35, Crying Because You Have No Fucking Clue Why You Are So SAD.  Or, why you are binge eating again, or why you are ____________.

Some story-tellers make up (better than the reality...) stories about themselves to avoid having to deal with (or answer questions about) who they really are and where they came from.  I have seen people create personas for themselves to shield their real selves.  Lots of this is about protection, fear and not DEALING WITH THE PAST, and sometimes people are truly stuck in their past, or dealing with severe narcissism.  

(I know, I know, I've got a ridiculous cartoonish banner up top and a blog called, Melting Mama.  I did not know that I would be blogging long-term, nor that anyone would ever see the stupidity that is my name.  That said, it's really me.  I am cartoonish.  It's not fake.)  

Their motive might be as simple as making themselves appear shiny and special, because their reality sort of blows.  We sell, of ourselves, what we want Others To See.  

Right? 

"I believe that the more we focus on the past…our unhappiness, discontentment, rage, disappointments, hurt, pain – even successes – the less we  live in the present. "

We NEED to clean out ours pasts in order to move on!

I would suggest that storytellers choose to share what we do in some type of self-preservation. Some of us share many facets of our lives, including things that aren't so shiny.  Many story-tellers (bloggers, mostly professional-types) try to maintain a mostly positive storyline, and that can be helpful to those who need to see those kind of messages.  

But, often, positive-only storytellers have something to sell us.  It's just the truth.  If I want to sell you something, I do it with a positive spin.  (I know how to sell something, go find a review post for a product I really LIKE.  It's mostly positive.)  I wouldn't dare give you the reality of post op weight loss surgery life if I wanted to sell you... weight loss surgery.  But I am not in the business of selling weight loss surgery, nor the happy that comes post operatively.

And the truth of the life after WLS, for many, sucks.  Not all the time, and not forever.  And for some it's super-awesomely-wicked-great, and that's super!  Go YOU!  But, for many it's not.  Would yo ulike to discuss how many people I've been in contact with in the last three months that were suicidal? 

It's a problem.  Stuffing our issues back in our pasts?  Does Not Help In the Least.

I am in the business of sharing.  Here, there, everywhere.  If this makes me a story-teller, so be it.  Your sharing HELPS others, to realize...

CNN - 

You are not alone.

You belong.

And it gets better.

These are a few of a handful of powerful messages that an elegantly designed "belonging intervention" by social psychologist and Stanford assistant professor Gregory Walton conveys to study participants who are going through a difficult period.

In a series of ongoing studies, first published in 2007 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the belonging intervention uses a technique known as "attributional retraining" to help people shift blame for negative events from "It's just me" to "I'm not alone, and there are others going through it."

The goal is to convey to the subjects that when bad things happen, it doesn't mean they don't belong in general.

Why is this important?

"We don't have a word for the opposite of loneliness, but if we did, I could say that's what I want in life." So began a stunning meditation by Marina Keegan, a 22-year-old Yale graduate who died in a tragic car accident May 26.

What is the opposite of loneliness? Is it belonging?

Because as humans, we need to belong. To one another, to our friends and families, to our culture and country, to our world.

Belonging is primal, fundamental to our sense of happiness and well-being.

Belonging is a psychological lever that has broad consequences, writes Walton. Our interests, motivation, health and happiness are inextricably tied to the feeling that we belong to a greater community that may share common interests and aspirations.

Isolation, loneliness and low social status can harm a person's subjective sense of well-being, as well as his or her intellectual achievement, immune function and health. Research shows that even a single instance of exclusion can undermine well-being, IQ test performance and self-control.

Walton's earlier studies demonstrated that a sense of social belonging can affect motivation and continued persistence, even on impossible tasks. That is, if you don't feel like you belong, you are both less motivated and less likely to hang in there in the face of obstacles.

Even outside a research setting, these are valuable lessons we can all draw from as we navigate life's difficult circumstances. Though Walton's research has involved only students, his work has powerful implications for the workplace and other contexts.

According to Rajita Sinha, the head of Yale's Stress Center, stress itself is not necessarily a bad thing. But stress that is sustained, uncontrollable and overwhelming, in which people can't figure out options to solve their problems, wreaks havoc on us.

Walton's belonging intervention has the potential to downgrade uncontrollable stress by allowing people to put a narrative around their traumatic experiences.

It places those experiences in a box, he says, "with a beginning, a middle and an end. As a consequence, the meaning of the negative experience is constrained, and people understand that when bad things happen, it's not just them, they are not alone, and that it's something that passes."

So what exactly does the belonging intervention involve?

In a broad sense, storytelling.

Walton and his colleagues enlist the study subjects as experts to help "others" who may be similarly situated and going through a difficult time.

The researchers provide subjects with statistics, quotations and stories from upperclassmen about their experiences -- how they struggled at first but eventually got through it -- and ask participants to use that information to write about getting through their own difficulties and how it gets better.

The participants, who believe they are writing for the next generation of incoming freshmen -- an audience many of them relate to and care about -- begin to engage with the material and use it to reflect on their own experiences, ultimately coming to the conclusion that no matter how bad they feel, they are not alone.

This is particularly powerful in settings where people have a looming alternative explanation, as in the case of minorities, women and gay youth.

Please read the whole article at

http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/01/health/enayati-importance-of-belonging/index.html#


MM Interview for 20/20 today

This is all I have right now. Will blog more later. OMG!

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blogstipation

I have blogstipation.  It's my word and I am claiming it, except I can't because I just Google'd it and noted the pages and pages of results.  Instead, I am stealing it and creating my own:

 noun \ˈblȯg, Ëˆbläg\(t)-stə-ˈpā-shən\

The inability to get words on the digital screen in the matter desired.  

*See also - "writers' block," but not really.

Writers-block-1

Why?  Because.  *stamps feet*  It's my blog and I can have stuck words if I WANT to.

Continue reading "blogstipation" »


Maggie Goes Down The Toilet - "Maggie Goes on a Diet."

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Did you know that we are part of an online FLASH MOB!  Get yer pitchforks!  RAWR!  

Not so much.  But, I still don't think this book is a good idea.  

AP News via myfoxLA -

The online mess for Kramer began recently with outraged commenters on Amazon, where pre-orders have not propelled Maggie anywhere near the top of the rankings. There is now a "savemaggie" hashtag on Twitter, a "Say No to Maggie Goes on a Diet" Facebook page, calls for a boycott and demands that Amazon and Barnes & Noble pull the book.

Kramer will not disclose how many orders he has for Maggie, which will not be in circulation until October. While most of the attention has been negative, he said, there are supporters, like this one who responded to a book basher on Twitter: "She's 14, not 6. Are you seriously suggesting that, with the obesity problem in this country, that a book teaching children to exercise and eat right, is somehow IMMORAL? I bet your fat."

Kramer, who went on "Good Morning America" and CNN to defend the book, already has regrets, although using the word "diet" is not one of them. Diet, he said, is not a dirty word as many of his angry critics have declared. Even for a book clearly most appropriate for little kids? He insists he didn't have 4-year-olds in mind, thinking more along the lines of 8 and up.

"The main message was that Maggie went on a diet predominantly because she loves sports and wanted to be able to run faster, bend more easily and be better able to play sports more effectively," Kramer told The Associated Press by phone from Maui, where he lives with his wife and soccer-loving, 16-year-old son.

Kramer, who struggled with obesity as a child and a young adult and still works to keep the pounds off, wishes Maggie's fantasy self in the mirror had not been quite so thin on the book's cover. He also wishes her transformation through weight loss had not been quite so much: 51 pounds in a little more than eight months.

"Now that I see the controversy I would say that I would have had her lose about 30 pounds and still have a little way to go," said Kramer, who is neither a physician nor a nutrition expert.

He said he is just a guy who wants to inspire overweight kids to be healthy.

"I regret that people associated the word 'diet' as me trying to push dieting on 4-year-olds and 6-year-olds. I'm not," Kramer said. "To me, diet means a change of habits, eating nutritiously, losing unhealthy weight."

Leslie Sanders, medical director of the Eating Disorder Program at Goryeb Children's Center in Summit, New Jersey, thinks Kramer's references to dieting in a rhyming picture book featuring a teen girl are unfortunate. The same goes for the notion that a child's key to success, beauty and popularity is being thin.

"There's a mismatch here," Sanders said. "You've got a rhyming book you're reading to a 4-year-old or a 6-year-old about a teenager focused on weight and eating. Why should young children be thinking about weight? There's no reason to have literature about dieting for young children at all."

In addition, most little kids don't sit down as Maggie the teen does once her "diet" begins and whip up their own oatmeal with yogurt and fruit, or prepare their own turkey sandwich with mustard and lettuce, followed by a dinner of vegetables "with various proteins," as the book describes.

You know who makes those choices for little kids? Their parents, Sanders said. The ones that do not appear in the book about Maggie the red pigtailed teen. In fact, there are no adults in the book at all.

That disturbs Arden Greenspan-Goldberg, a New York City psychotherapist who specializes in eating disorders and has a 22-year-old daughter.

"As women and mothers, we have our work cut out for us," she said. "We hope that when our girls look in the mirror, they like what they see."

Contrary to the online flash mob, Maggie does stand up to her tormenters in her own sad, quiet way.

"Most of the times Maggie did not wish to respond or counterattack," Kramer writes. "On rare occasions Maggie got so mad she could not hold back. She said, 'Is your life so boring that you have nothing else better to do? How would you like it and how would you feel if everyone picked on you? So

lose your stinger and make like a bee and buzz on through.'"

Once Maggie drops the weight, she not only gains gal pals but enjoys the attention of, urg, guys, another little something that young girls do not really need to think about.

She also gets higher grades and is invited to her first sleepover, bringing along deodorant spray so she doesn't have to worry about leaving a smell when she uses the bathroom.

Meanwhile, back on the soccer field, the teen encounters a pudgy, smaller girl as she practices and offers some tips. "She reminded Maggie of how Maggie was before she lost the weight," Kramer writes.

The book concludes, as Maggie collects a soccer trophy: "It is sad that people are judged mainly because of how they look. A pretty cover does not necessarily guarantee a good book."

 


Stop Talking To Yourself.

You’ve got opinions, man
We’re all entitled to ‘em, but I never asked
So let me thank you for your time, and try not to waste anymore of mine
And get out of here fast
I hate to break it to you babe, but I’m not drowning
There’s no one here to save
Who cares if you disagree?
You are not me
Who made you king of anything?
So you dare tell me who to be?
Who died and made you king of anything?
You sound so innocent, all full of good intent
Swear you know best
But you expect me to jump up on board with you
And ride off into your delusional sunset.

____________________________________________________________________

When you make a choice to put yourself online as a blogger, you usually open up the opportunity for others to communicate with you.  

That is supposed to be part of being a blogger:  allowing two-way communication.  

However, when the opportunity for outside voices to add to the conversation are shut down, it appears that you are talking to yourself.  "Hello hand!  Hi hand!"

How-to-change-your-life
STOP TALKING TO YOURSELF AND ABOUT YOURSELF.

Talking to yourself is typically a non-acceptable behavior in public, am I right?  You'd likely poke fun at the women talking to her hand bag, or take a video of her and post it to YouTube.

I am not sure why we as bloggers, make it acceptable, to dump our opinions out like trash and let them stink, and not allow others to tell us THEY SMELL BAD.  We, as bloggers, must know if we are stinking.  (I am working on it.  Got new deodorant, totally NOT product linking here, sorry social media lady.)

I understand that it "feels better" to keep yourself safe in a blog bubble and to let no one penetrate your space with  different ideas.   But when you leave only a certain angle of commentary and cut out any dissenting opinion or even any questioning -- it looks strange.  Bleached.

A blog without any comments, is NOT A BLOG.  

It's you, like an evangelical preacher!  Maybe that's what YOU want?  Maybe you ARE AN EVANGELICAL PREACHER!  (But, honey, if this is a weight loss blog, it AIN'T ABOUT RELIGION.  Unless, you have a WWJD, WW? Weight Loss Blog.)

Coding Horror -

"It's more like a church pulpit. You preach the word, and the audience passively receives your evangelical message. Straight from God's lips to their ears. When the sermon is over, the audience shuffles out of the church, inspired for another week. And there's definitely no question and answer period afterward."

A blog without comments is not a community.

A blog with only half of the comments is a white-washed community.  

Coding Horror -

"However, to deny public conversation by disabling comments right out of the gate --based on the presumption that the comments will be of low quality -- is, again, awfully elitist. Have some respect for your audience. Enable comments and experiment before making the assumption that 90 percent of the comments will be crap!"

Why aren't everyone's opinions valid?  

elitism.jpg

What makes one person's comments, questions and ideas more valid and useful than another?  

Is it due something we can classify, like age, sex, race, color, creed, nationality, disabilty -- or is it just because You Don't Like Her or That One, He's Just, Weird, Delete Him."

Who gets to choose who gets to comment -- or who gets to "stay?"

I find it disgusting.  As bloggers we must find spammers and eat them for breakfast, yes, I delete ALL spam and all suggestions to spam.  I probably over delete, since I see every outlink as spam, and I do not allow ANY not-in-context of conversation sales links, MLM or other crap spread on my pages, anywhere.  

But legitimate community interaction should be not only suggested but thanked.

Stop cleansing your communities, your blog readers are NOT your employees, they do not work for you, you do not pay them, every opinion, IS VALID.  Unless someone is attacking you, let it fly.  

What harm is there in DIFFERENCE?  Try it.

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EES + OAC Event

Next month, on April 14-15, I'll be joining some of my peers in New York City for an event sponsored by Ethicon Endo-Surgery and the Obesity Action Coalition.  

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We'll hear and learn about -

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This is a great opportunity for us, as bloggers to learn, and for the industry to learn from US.    I'm excited because it's not often that an event is created to discuss these topics, from this aspect, the blogger side, the writer's side.

*This event is sponsored by Ethicion Endo-Surgery and the OAC, and my expenses for this trip have been covered in full.  

Thank you.

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NYC - 2009 - My photo

Awkward segue -

This makes the opportunity to meet some BBGC's in person in NYC!  I haven't been to New York since fall 2009, when I took a super-fast-run through the city for photos during a Obesity Help.com event.

At this point, several BBGC's have been invited to this event,  and why not meet you while we are already there?  Three of us are rooming together so far, we gave up our single rooms because, it's silly, we can share.   And, then there's always the cupcakes.  <g>  

I've set up an impromptu event page, for a get together after the event with local friends.  If you're near NYC, let us know!  

I guess I'll need some, shoes, too.  


marie claire + fit blogs

The women's magazine marie claire published an article:  

The Hunger Diaries: How Health Writers Could Be Putting You at Risk 

  • Six popular bloggers advocate healthier living, but are they putting readers — and themselves — in danger?

This article has blown up on Twitter, as the healthy blogging community has lashed out, saying that the article has taken the bloggers out of context and twisted their words around.  

"Then there's the effect on readers. "The sheer number of food images and intense exercise descriptions can be particularly triggering to eating-disorder-prone followers," says Dr. Robyn Silverman, a developmental psychologist in Mount Freedom, New Jersey, whose book, Good Girls Don't Get Fat (published in October), addresses influences on female body image. Silverman worries readers could log on and "push their bodies to the extreme to match the workouts or eating habits of their idols, when it may be inappropriate."

Now, I have to admit, I am not a faithful reader of any of the six blogs they mention in the article, however, I do follow some of the bloggers on Twitter, and will read bits and pieces of what they post.

I find it difficult to read most typical health and fitness blogs, especially those high in "what I ate today" and "I ran ten miles today" posts because I cannot relate.  Simple as that.

If a mom of four, who was formerly 300+ lbs, with dietary restrictions, health concerns, and with a neurological condition started blogging about her fitness regimen, I might take notice.  But, for now, typical "healthy" blogs make me tired.

I live in a different world at the moment.

Continue reading "marie claire + fit blogs" »


Join Us at BlogWorld

Join us in Las Vegas October 14th-16th for BlogWorld & New Media Expo, the world’s largest New Media event, and take advantage of our special Promotional Code SIXAPART20 to receive a 20% discount!

via everything.typepad.com

Look, a coupon!  That will get me in!  :D  Or not.  But, I literally just had a blogasm over this, a blogging conference.  OMGMUSTGO.   Who wants to send me?  

<making puppy dog eyes, whimper, whimper, cry, sniff>

I might have to sell ovums for this.

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Social Networking Influences Health Behaviors?

People
This is why we Facebook, Tweet and post on message boards about our medical issues!  It truly does help us along!  Very interesting stuff here:

Continue reading "Social Networking Influences Health Behaviors?" »


WLS Bloggers -Check this Out - Lauren's Hope Deal.

I know there are many of you out there who write your own WLS or health-related blog: Picture 42

"If you own a WEBSITE or publish a BLOG, we welcome you to link to www.laurenshope.com.  If you mention Lauren's Hope on your blog or website and post a permanent link to us, email the URL to: links@laurenshope.com.  Once the link has been verified you will receive a 1 time $50 gift certificate."

There's a permalink.  That's a good deal, Lauren's Hope bracelets are The Spendy.

Signed - A reactive hypoglycemic with seizures who fails to wear a medical ID at all, because I'm a doofus.


How to Create and Promote Your Blog - Video

I don't typically blog about blogging, much.

I get a lot of questions from those of you OUT THERE IN THE INTERWEBS who WANT TO BLOG, whether for personal reasons or for your business.  I find it crazy because I haven't got a clue as to what I am doing.  It even wilder when a business asks me for advice, and it happens all the time.

I love this stuff.  I'm a dork.

How to Create and Promote Your Blog -- presented by Jason Falls on Vimeo.

"Jason’s big idea: Great blogs stand for something. When it comes to the issues you care about, be bold and be honest — even when it goes against what the other bloggers are saying."