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OAC's Inaugural Convention Provides Ground-breaking Education to Hundreds of Individuals Concerned with Weight and Health

Obesity Action Coalition’s Your Weight Matters National Convention “Explore. Discover. Empower.” Provides Ground-breaking Education to Hundreds of Individuals Concerned with Weight and Health

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Tampa, Fla. – In late October, Obesity Action Coalition (OAC) members from more than 34 states gathered in Dallas, Texas, for a ground-breaking health and weight educational convention. 

The Convention provided attendees direct access to the country’s leading experts and thought-leaders in weight and health. The Convention included 18 educational sessions, led by the country’s leading experts, on diverse topics, designed to arm attendees with the most current information on excess weight, bariatric surgery, health, nutrition, exercise and more.

In addition to educational sessions, on Friday and Saturday, attendees were also given the opportunity to participate in a Lunch with the Experts session. This session allowed attendees to sit one-on-one with an expert and have an in-depth conversation about the topic of their choice. The Convention also featured a special Advocacy Training session, focused on training the OAC’s next set of advocates. A total of 68 attendees learned from experts in healthcare policy on how to advocate for access to treatment, awareness and more.

The evenings of the Convention were filled with social events to allow attendees the opportunity to connect with one another.  On Friday night, the OAC hosted a Halloween-themed costume party in conjunction with its OAC State of the Association address. On Saturday evening, the OAC hosted the 1st OAC Annual Awards Dinner honoring six members for their outstanding service in areas such as
advocacy, weight bias and membership recruitment. The Convention wrapped on Sunday morning with the Dallas Walk from Obesity. The Dallas Walk raised more than $24,000 to increase awareness, prevention, education and advocacy in obesity and offered more than 250 walkers a host of activities from face-painting to a silent auction.

“The OAC wanted to create a warm and welcoming environment where attendees felt comfortable to be themselves, learn from experts and unite with each other. This was definitely accomplished and so much more, and we are excited to welcome so many to the OAC family through our Convention,” said Joe Nadglowski, OAC President and CEO.

The Convention’s success was due in large part to the OAC National Board of Directors and Convention Planning Committee for their dedication to excellence. In addition, the Convention would not have been possible without the generous support of its National Sponsors: Gold – Eisai, and Vivus, Inc.; and Bronze –Bariatric Advantage, Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Geisinger, and Methodist Weight Management Institute. The OAC is also grateful for the support of the 19 exhibitors who participated in the Convention.

The OAC has already begun planning the 2013 Your Weight Matters National Convention and a formal announcement will take place in December. For more information on the Your Weight Matters National Convention, please visit www.YWMConvention.com.

The OAC is a National nonprofit charity dedicated to helping individuals affected by obesity. The OAC was formed to bring together individuals struggling with weight issues and provide educational resources and advocacy tools.



Obesity Action Coalition Honors Extraordinary Members at 1st Annual OAC Awards Dinner

Obesity Action Coalition Honors Extraordinary Members at 1st Annual OAC Awards Dinner

On October 27, during the Your Weight Matters Inaugural Convention, the OAC recognized some of our outstanding members at the 1st Annual OAC Awards Dinner. The OAC presented six members with the following OAC awards based on their service and dedication to the OAC:

Advocate of the Year

This award is given to the OAC Member who has lead the charge in taking on and engaging others in advocacy initiatives. This individual is a tireless advocate advancing the cause of fighting obesity and representing individuals affected.

The recipient of the OAC Advocate of the Year award was Beth Sheldon-Badore, of Plymouth, MA. Beth is a long-time member and supporter of the OAC, and she continuously advocates for those affected by obesity.

 

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OAC President Joe Naglowski and I with my award

 

Community Leader of the Year

This award is given to an individual who continually works in their community to advance the cause of fighting obesity. The recipient is an individual who actively engages their community or with their constituency in spreading awareness of obesity and encourages others to get involved in activities that further the mission of the OAC.

The recipient of the Community Leader of the Year award was Tammy Beaumont, BSN, RN, BC, CBN, of Dallas, TX. Tammy, a long-time OAC member, is extremely involved in fighting obesity in her community through the OAC as well as the Walk from Obesity.

Outstanding Membership Recruitment by an OAC Member


This award is designated for the individual OAC member who is an active membership recruiter in the OAC. The individual is a regular membership promoter and continually encourages membership in the OAC.

The recipient of the Outstanding Membership Recruitment by an OAC Member award was Michelle Vicari, from Temecula, CA. Michelle continuously works to raise awareness of the OAC, as the positive impact of membership in our organization.

Outstanding Membership Recruitment by a Physician

This award is given to the Sponsored Membership Program participant (physician) that recruited the highest number of new members in the OAC in the 12 months prior to the Convention month.

The recipient of the Outstanding Membership Recruitment by a Physician award was Rocky Mountain Associated Physicians. Rocky Mountain Associated Physicians is a leader in the OAC’s Sponsored Membership Program. Through the Sponsored Membership Program, they purchase memberships in the OAC for each of their patients. To date, they joined 268 members in the OAC during 2012!

Bias Buster of the Year

The OAC’s Bias Buster of the Year is awarded to the individual who has lead the charge to put the OAC on path to effect change in mindsets, policies and public perception of weight bias. This individual is both proactive and reactive in responding to weight bias issues and is an example to others on how to get involved as a Bias Buster.

The recipient of the OAC’s Bias Buster of the Year was Rebecca Puhl, PhD from New Haven, CT. Rebecca is a member of the OAC’s Board of Directors and is the leading expert on weight bias. She is also the current chair of the OAC’s Weight Bias Committee. Her profound knowledge on weight bias allows the OAC to tackle a variety of bias issues ranging from entertainment to healthcare and more.

Member of the Year
This is the OAC’s highest honor and is awarded to an OAC member who goes above and beyond to help the OAC in its efforts to achieve its mission and goals. This individual is an exemplary OAC member and continually represents the OAC in impacting the obesity epidemic.

The recipient of the OAC Member of the Year award was Ted Kyle, RPh, MBA, of Pittsburgh, PA. Ted sits on the OAC’s Board of Directors and is also a member of several OAC committees. His extensive knowledge in the field of obesity has continually assisted the OAC in advocacy efforts, combating weight bias, developing educational resources and more.

The OAC National Board of Directors and staff congratulate these individuals and recognize them for their continued support and dedication to the OAC, our mission and goals.


Bariatric surgery for diabetes tops innovation rankings

Cleveland Clinic announced its list of Top 10 Medical Innovations that will have a major impact on improving patient care within the next year. The list of breakthrough devices and therapies was selected by a panel of Cleveland Clinic physicians and scientists and announced today during Cleveland Clinic’s 2012 Medical Innovation Summit.

And, number one --

Via Cleveland Clinic -

1. Bariatric Surgery for Control of Diabetes 
Exercise and diet alone are not effective for treating severe obesity or Type 2 diabetes. Once a person reaches 100 pounds or more above his or her ideal weight, losing the weight and keeping it off for many years almost never happens.

While the medications we have for diabetes are good, about half of the people who take them are not able to control their disease. This can often lead to heart attack, blindness, stroke, and kidney failure.

Surgery for obesity, often called bariatric surgery, shrinks the stomach into a small pouch and rearranges the digestive tract so that food enters the small intestine at a later point than usual.

Over the years, many doctors performing weight-loss operations found that the surgical procedure would rid patients of Type 2 diabetes, oftentimes before the patient left the hospital.

Many diabetes experts now believe that weight-loss surgery should be offered much earlier as a reasonable treatment option for patients with poorly controlled diabetes —and not as a last resort.


Mini Squee - #YWMconvention #OAC

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On October 27th, 2012, during the Obesity Action Coalition "Your Weight Matters" Event at the Hilton Anatole
, there will be another first: the first annual OAC Awards!

Your friendly blogger was nominated in one of these categories, and I am thankful to you for that.  Thank you.  And, really, thank you.

I will be present at the events, dinner, ceremony, and of course the Walk From Obesity with at least $6000.00 in donations from Team MM + BBGC.  

Have I mentioned that there is still time to donate to Team MM + BBGC and I do not see your donation in yet?  

Go ahead, I will wait for you!

Thank you - and see you there? 

There is still time to register for the OAC event!  

Do. not. miss. it.

 Join the OAC event on Facebook!

 

 

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About the OAC Awards -

The following awards will be presented during the OAC Inaugural Your Weight Matters National Convention:

OAC Advocate of the Year - This award is given to the OAC Member who has lead the charge in taking on National, local and state advocacy issues. This individual should be a tireless advocate to advance the cause of fighting obesity and the individual affected by obesity.

Community Leader of the Year - This award is given to an individual who continually works in their community to advance the cause of fighting obesity. The recipient should be an individual who actively engages their community or with their constituency in spreading awareness of obesity and encourages others to get involved in activities that further the mission of the OAC.

Outstanding Membership Recruitment by an OAC Member - This award is designated for the individual OAC member who is an active membership recruiter in the OAC. The individual is a regular membership promoter and continually encourages membership in the OAC.

Outstanding Membership Recruitment by a Physician - This award is given to the Sponsored Membership Program participant (physician) that has recruited the most new members in the OAC in the 12 months prior to the Convention month. The recipient of the award has encouraged membership in the OAC by purchasing it on behalf of the patient.

Bias Buster of the Year - The OAC’s Bias Buster of the Year is awarded to the individual who has lead the charge to put the OAC on path to effect change in mindsets, policies and public perception of weight bias. This individual is both proactive and reactive in responding to weight bias issues and is an example to others on how to get involved as a Bias Buster.

OAC Member of the Year - This is the OAC’s highest honor and is awarded to an OAC member who goes above and beyond to help the OAC in its efforts to achieve its mission and goals. This individual is an exemplary OAC member and continually represents the OAC in impacting the obesity epidemic.

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The Obesity Action Coalition (OAC) is set to host a ground-breaking educational convention on weight and health, the Inaugural “Your Weight Matters” National Convention. Join them in Dallas, October 25-28 for this ground-breaking Convention that will answer all your questions about weight and health! For more information, please visit www.YWMConvention.com.

 


Surgeons Perform World’s First Simultaneous Kidney Transplant and Weight Loss Surgery : Science/Tech : Medical Daily

Surgeons Perform World’s First Simultaneous Kidney Transplant and Weight Loss Surgery : Science/Tech : Medical Daily.

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Continue reading "Surgeons Perform World’s First Simultaneous Kidney Transplant and Weight Loss Surgery : Science/Tech : Medical Daily" »


Cutting calories may not add years to your life

"Don't feel so bad that you can't get yourself to this phenomenally lean, you might say emaciated, body state," says Austad, "because there's not any evidence that that's really going to help you live a lot longer anyway."
NPR 

Booyah.  Case closed.  Cut it out.

Morning Edition

[3 min 56 sec]
 

 




Can sugar make you stupid? Studies point to yes.

298x232-Sugar-298x232_NV_sugar

Can sugar make you stupid?  

Oh dear.   

If the following study regarding the ingestion of sugar and cognition is true -- I should be gaining brains instead of losing them -- considering that I eat about 95% less of the sweet stuff since I had roux en y gastric bypass surgery.  

However as we all know, *MY brains are very special since I had weight loss surgery.   

The combination of a high-sugar intake and a lack of Omega-3 Fatty Acids caused brain fail in rats!  

What about... us?  What if poor diet causes brain issues that aren't reversible?  This intrigues me.

National Geographic -

 Sweet drinks scrambled the memories and stunted learning in lab rats in a new study—leading to "high concern" over what sugary diets may do to people, according to neuroscientist Fernando Gomez-Pinilla. (Read more about memory from National Geographic magazine.)

 For the study, Gomez-Pinilla's team first trained rats to successfully navigate a maze, giving them only water and standard rat chow for five days. During the following six weeks, the rats' water was replaced with syrups that were 15 percent fructose.

"Most sodas people consume are about 12 percent sugar, so imagine if you drank soda with sugar added instead of water," said Gomez-Pinilla, of the University of California, Los Angeles.m

During the six-week period, half the rodents were also given flaxseed oil and fish oil—both rich in omega-3 fatty acids. These antioxidants may protect against damage to chemical connections in the brain called synapses, past research suggests.

After six weeks of the fructose syrup, all the rats were slower at running the maze. However, those that had received omega-3s were slightly faster than their counterparts.

By studying the dissected brains of the study rats, the researchers determined that the high-fructose diets had sabotaged the ability of synapses to change, a key factor in learning. The sugary drinks had also disrupted the sugar-regulating protein insulin in a brain area called the hippocampus, which play a role in memory formation in both rats and humans.t

"I was very shocked to see how strong an effect these diets could have on the brain—I have high concern that the foods people eat can really affect mood and cognition," Gomez-Pinilla said.

Study Abstract -

We pursued studies to determine the effects of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in brain, and the possibilities to modulate these effects by dietary interventions. In addition, we have assessed potential mechanisms by which brain metabolic disorders can impact synaptic plasticity and cognition.
We report that high-dietary fructose consumption leads to increase in insulin resistance index, insulin and triglyceride levels, which characterize MetS. Rats fed on an n-3 deficient diet showed memory deficits in Barnes Maze, which were further exacerbated by fructose intake.
In turn, n-3 deficient diet and fructose interventions disrupted insulin receptor signaling in hippocampus as evidenced by a decrease in phosphorylation of insulin receptor and its downstream effector Akt.
We found that high fructose consumption with n-3 deficient diet disrupts membrane homeostasis as evidenced by an increase in the ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids and levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a marker of lipid peroxidation.
Disturbances in brain energy metabolism due to n-3 deficiency and fructose treatments were evidenced by a significant decrease in AMPK phosphorylation and its upstream modulator LKB1 as well as a decrease in Sir2 levels. The decrease in phosphorylation of CREB, synapsin I and synaptophysin (SYP) levels by n-3 deficiency and fructose shows the impact of metabolic dysfunction on synaptic plasticity. All parameters of metabolic dysfunction related to the fructose treatment were ameliorated by the presence of dietary n-3 fatty acid.
Results showed that dietary n-3 fatty acid deficiency elevates the vulnerability to metabolic dysfunction and impaired cognitive functions by modulating insulin receptor signaling and synaptic plasticity.

 


Study - Successful Weight Loss Among Obese U.S. Adults - How?

What WORKS to lose weight?  

Tapewormdiet1
Most of you know that weight loss surgery often works in the long term to lose weight, but not everyone (No, really...)  is a candidate for surgery

 Also, in the long-term it's not unusual for bariatric surgery post ops to again embark on diet plans to lose regained weight.  Shocking, I know!

What works?  What can we do to lose weight successfully?

Not fad diets.  Also, SHOCKING?  /end sarcasm 

If you want to lose weight, eat less fat, exercise more, and prescription weight loss pills.  Wait, really?  

That's what works?  Apparently, according to a new study from the American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

CBS -

"Researchers analyzed data from more than 4,000 obese people over the age of 20 with a body mass index of 30 or more and then interviewed them one year later. Over half of them were trying to lose weight when the study began. By the end of the study, 40 percent said they lost at least 5 percent of their body weight, while 20 percent of participants lost 10 percent or more.

Among the participants who shed pounds, they often reported working out and eating fewer fatty foods. Those who were in weight loss programs lost even greater amounts of weight.

Duh.  Right?  More from CBS -

What didn't work? Those people who participated in popular diets, liquid diets nonprescription weight loss pills and diet foods/products didn't see the scale tip in the right direction.

"It's very encouraging to find that the most of the weight loss methods associated with success are accessible and inexpensive," senior author Dr. Christina Wee, co-director of research in the division of general medicine and primary care at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center,  said in the statement.

"There are lots of fad diets out there as well as expensive over-the-counter medications that have not necessarily been proven to be effective, and it is important that Americans discuss product claims with their doctor before trying such products."

No fad diets.  Did you read that?  Stop it.

The study -

Successful Weight Loss Among Obese U.S. Adults
May 2012, Vol. 42, No. 5

Background: Little is known about weight control strategies associated with successful weight loss among obese U.S. adults in the general population.

Among those attempting weight loss, 1026 (40%) lost 5% and 510 (20%) lost 10% weight after adjustment for potential confounders, strategies associated with losing 5% weight included eating less fat; exercising more; and usingprescription weight loss medications 

Eating less fat; exercising more; and using prescription weight loss medications were also associated with losing 10% weight, as wasjoining commercial weight loss programs.

Adults eating diet products were less likely to achieve 10% weight loss Liquid diets, nonprescription diet pills, and popular diets had no association with successful weight loss.

Conclusions:

A substantial proportion of obese U.S. adults who attempted to lose weight reported
weight loss, at least in the short term.  Obese adults were more likely to report achieving meaningful weight loss if they ate less fat, exercised more, used prescription weight loss medications, or participated in commercial weight loss programs.


That time I was called a Munchhausen Bitch - and more! Now with monetization!

I figure that if I can't respond, I might as well earn money from the hate I garner, no?  

PS.  This stuff is EXTRAORDINARILY HATEFUL.  If you are easily angered, go take your happy first and come back.   Also, I know the truth, I realize this is NOT my problem.  However, in the spirit of being open, honest and in my way of TMI -- you get to see what I see.  I also realize that 'haters gon hate,' and all that jazz.  But you might as well see it.  I don't want pity.  I'm not the one who needs it.  Clearly.

Today I was pointed to a forum that was loaded with all sorts of anger, some directed at me, quite pointedly.   "Why?"  I don't understand, to be honest.  There are some really effed up accusations, and I only read two threads.  I copied it all and sent it to my husband -- because he was involved in the hate -- and I was deleted from the forum.

  • "Hi Beth, you f-cked up Munchhausen bitch."
  • Continue reading "That time I was called a Munchhausen Bitch - and more! Now with monetization!" »


    Colonoscopy results (Classy, I am.)

    SPECIMEN SUBMITTED: GI BX (1 JAR)

    Procedure date     Tissue received     Report Date    Diagnosed by
    12/13/2011 12/13/2011 12/20/2011 DR. J. GOLDSMITH/ttl

    DIAGNOSIS

     Sigmoid polyp, polypectomy:  Fragments of adenoma.

    Clinical: Left lower quadrant pain.  Abdominal bloating.

    Is one's risk of having colon cancer increased by having had an adenoma?

    An individual's risk of colon cancer is approximately double the general population once an adenomatous polyp is found. This individual's risk of developing colon cancer can be significantly reduced by removing the polyp and any future polyps.

    Hawt.

    Still doesn't explain the pain.  But.  There's this.

     

     


    Allurion Technologies of Mass creating a WEIGHT LOSS "PILL?"

    A local Massachusetts company is creating a swallowable weight loss device:  a pill encasing a hydrogel substance that E X P A N D S in your stomach and creates a sense of satiety.  

    Wh-what?  I am MORE than intrigued with this possibilty.  There are various nutritional products on the market that claim satiety with fullness (What up ROCA LABS?) but a long-term solution from a "device?"  

    That product is a large, but swallowable, pill carrying a super-porous hydrogel to the stomach. The material can expand 200 to 300 times its size, though Allurion’s won’t hit that size. When the treatment is done, the material would be dissolved via an oral solution.

    So long as it's not diaper filling, I am very interested to know more.  Article below --

    Continue reading "Allurion Technologies of Mass creating a WEIGHT LOSS "PILL?"" »


    Leave it to MM to scare you out of a colonoscopy.

    *Please send hate mail to meltingmamamelted@gmail.com ... because someone is BOUND to say it, "MM this only happens to you."  Also -- NOTE -- colonscopies CAN BE a life-saving procedure, they can find disease... Please get your procedures done.

    I got to the hospital right on time, was taken straight back to change into a gown for the test, and waited mostly patiently for my nurse.  I was given an IV of saline, and taken back to the procedure room.

    339517_2547917771894_1072296476_2694011_392507215_o

    The nurse, Leslie (go figure, I REMEMBER!) gave me the run-down of what was to happen, and I waited for the GI doctor.  He came in, had me sign off on the procedure and away we went.  The nurse gave me medication through my IV --

    Screen Shot 2011-12-13 at 3.42.30 PM

    And the doctor started the colonscopy. 

    I felt every bit of it.  While I was slightly sedated, I could feel the scope moving through my system, and the water flushing as well.  I was able to turn and watch the screen, I watched several parts of my intestines flash in front of me.  That kept my mind off the discomfort, a little bit.

    I was under the impression that I would be ASLEEP for the procedure, or at least sedated to unawareness, AND have amnesia of the event. 

    Non-sedation colonoscopy IS performed, and it's NOT COMFORTABLE, but people do choose this.

    During the procedure, I heard the doctor and nurse discussing that I might need a little more medication because I wasn't responding to the initial dose.  At some point I started shivering pretty badly, and I remember them asking if I was cold.  I was, and I was also FEELING the scope INSIDE MY GUT. 

    I would assume I got a little bit more medication through the IV.    And, honestly, I think I had just enough sedation that I was unable to verbalize just how uncomfortable I was.  I could only get out basic responses.

    The GI found a polyp, and removed it to send to biopsy.  I watched it on the screen, a tool took this little pimply bit and removed it.

    I was about to scream, if I could, when the doctor announced he was finished. 

    Two medications, and I was awake and aware.  Go me.  What can I do with this skill?

    333281_2549153522787_1072296476_2694256_201782054_o

    Resistant.

    My.

    Ass.

    Literally.   

    Screen Shot 2011-12-13 at 4.17.45 PM

    Now will you believe me that I FELT the upper ENDOSCOPY, TOO?   BECAUSE I DID. 

    "You can't POSSIBLY."

    BUT.  I did.  I do.  I am super-woman.

    Anyway - it appears that my lower intestine is "okay," aside from a polyp, it appears healthy so far as I can tell.  I'll hear more when I go back and swallow a camera.  Oo

     

     


    Fun with Magnesium Citrate!

    322983_2542152547767_1072296476_2692794_2064557055_o

    I have to take all three bottles of the fizzy, bitter goodness for my bowel prep.  Plus as much water as I can float.

    "Don't you have any shame?" 

    No.

    I poured the first one into a glass, added 1/3 packet of Crystal Light and some Splenda.  Almost drinkable.  But not.  I can feel every single bubble, and it feels like I've swallowed baking soda and vinegar as if it unclog a SINK.

    I'm a sink.  And.  Oh.

    Here we go.  Hold me.


    Colonoscopy Preparation is FUN!

    In twenty-four hours I will be in my hospital's Gastrointestinal Unit waiting room, awaiting the joy that is a colonoscopy.  Please note that the MM Sarcasm is currently dialed up to high.  Nobody really looks forward to tests, and for a test that involves forcing a camera up your arse, I'd better be a little silly about it or I'll whine.

    Continue reading "Colonoscopy Preparation is FUN!" »


    Tis The Season To Transfer Your Addiction - WLS and Alcoholism

    *Reposting from 2010*

    A few month gastric bypass post op writes --

    "Can I have a glass or two of wine?  I used to have a few glasses when I had a drink, would it be okay to just have one, or two now?"

    No.  

    Continue reading "Tis The Season To Transfer Your Addiction - WLS and Alcoholism " »


    Year of abdominal pain -- Hydrogen Breath Testing

    Update -

    Mr took me into Boston today for the Hydrogen Breath testing.  I thought I took to be there super-early, turns out I waited in the wrong part of the GI unit for an hour before realizing it. 

    I had to drink a lactulose solution, and puffed into a bag with a syringe on it.  My air was injected into a super cool gas analyzer machine and that's that.

    I think I passed -- or I failed?  I watched the numbers of the machine during each breath sample collection and I saw an increase in the numbers, however the tech said that she didn't see "much change."   So, bacteria may not be my problem.  Interestingly, the drink triggered more pain.  Thanks!  I don't DO 'OSES for that reason.

    322513_284005378310544_105130816198002_837133_1095045421_oSmall Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome (SBBOS) or Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) - the patient is either given a challenge dose of glucose, also known as dextrose (75-100 grams), or lactulose (10 grams). A baseline breath sample is collected, and then additional samples are collected at 15 minute or 20 minute intervals for 3–5 hours. Positive diagnosis for a lactulose SIBO breath test - typically positive if the patient produces approximately 20 ppm of hydrogen and/or methane within the first two hours (indicates bacteria in the small intestine), followed by a much larger peak (colonic response). This is also known as a biphasic pattern. Lactulose is not absorbed by the digestive system and can help determine distal end bacterial overgrowth, which means the bacteria are lower in the small intestine. Positive diagnosis for a glucose SIBO breath test - glucose is absorbed by the digestive system so studies have shown it to be harder to diagnose distal end bacterial overgrowth since the glucose typically doesn't reach the colon before being absorbed. An increase of approximately 12 ppm or more in hydrogen and/or methane during the breath test could conclude bacterial overgrowth. Recent study indicates "The role of testing for SIBO in individuals with suspected IBS remains unclear." [2]

    The excess hydrogen or methane is assumed to be typically caused by an overgrowth of otherwise normal intestinal bacteria.

    Tomorrow is marked with the most exciting of several tests in an attempt to narrow down my year of abdominal pain. This test could show the presence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth -- which is somewhat common in those who've got lower gut issues and also in those who have had gastric bypass or who have had abdominal surgeries.

    Bascially -- I breathe into a bag every so many minutes for a few hours.  The samples are collected and tested for the presence of excess gases.  'urp. Reading about these tests, and watching test videos and the excessive use of the word METHANE only brings to mind ... cows.

    Cow_lamp02

    If I get a positive result on this test -- I am starting a post bariatric energy company.  <sarcasm intended> There are far too many of us with broken guts who could probably power up our own houses with malabsorptive misfirings.

    Hydrogen Breath Testing

    The hydrogen breath test is used to identify lactose or fructose intolerance, or an abnormal growth of bacteria in the intestine. It is used to diagnose a lactose or fructose intolerance, which is the inability of the body to digest and or absorb lactose, the sugar found in dairy or fructose, the sugar found in a number of foods (fruit, vegetables, soda, etc.). Hydrogen breath testing can also be used to diagnose intestinal bacterial overgrowth. A breath sample will be collected and tested for the presence of hydrogen. To obtain the sample, you will be asked to blow up a balloon-type bag. Normally, very little hydrogen is detected in the breath. You will then be given a lactose, fructose, or lactulose solution to drink. Breath samples are collected every 15 minutes for 2 hours to detect any increase in hydrogen in the breath as the solution is digested. Increased hydrogen breath levels indicate improper digestion. The testing procedure lasts about 3 hours.

    Super-fun, but likely the easiest of the tests because nothing goes inside me.  See? 

    Next, is the capsule endoscopy. Then, the colonscopy for the holiday. 

    Dear Santa, I thought I'd been good...